October 12, 2012

Saturday at Dodge Poetry Festival


Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival
October 13, 2012

SATURDAY

9:00 A.M. -10:10 A.M.

In Praise: Music and Poetry
Kurtis Lamkin, Jane Hirshfield, Newark Boys Chorus
Prudential Hall

Poets Jane Hirshfield and Kurtis Lamkin are joined by the Newark Boys Chorus in this spoken and sung celebration of poems and songs of praise.
Conversation: Mirror Blossom Urn Collage
Henri Cole, Terrance Hayes, Fanny Howe, Larissa Szporluk
Victoria Theatre

Festival Poets Reading
Eavan Boland, Eduardo C. Corral, Timothy Liu
First Peddie Baptist Memorial Church

Festival Poets Reading
Dan Bellm, Cynthia Arrieu-King, Thomas Lux
Trinity & St. Philip’s Cathedral

10:30-11:40

Conversation: Poetry and Working Life
Eavan Boland, Dorianne Laux, Philip Levine, Joseph Millar
Prudential Hall

It is almost always assumed that a poet must perform some other work to earn a living and sustain a life in this art.  The late Stanley Kunitz, a lifelong gardener, advised younger poets to find some work that took them completely out of their heads, work that required physical engagement with the world.  Many poets have created some of their most powerful poems from work experiences, and from speaking for the silent and unheard who do some of our dirtiest and most thankless jobs.  What does it mean that we even draw a distinction between “work” and the poet’s work?


Conversation: Poetry and Pride
Dan Bellm, Henri Cole, Nikky Finney, Timothy Liu
Victoria Theatre

From Sappho to Whitman to Ginsberg to Rich, poetry as we know it would not exist without the contributions of the gay community.  No doubt members of the gay community, like those of many other minorities, have found and forged some of their sense of community through the shared experiences and feelings communicated through poetry.  How personal pride is discovered and fostered through poetry and the poetry community will be part of this conversation.       
Conversation: Lost and Found in Translation
Salgado Maranhão and Alexis Levitin, Raúl Zurita and Daniel Borzutsky
Chase Room

Robert Frost famously defined poetry as “what is lost in translation.”  Translator and poet Peter Cole turned this edict on its ear by claiming “poetry is what is found in translation.”  Festival Poets Raúl Zurita and Salgado Maranhão and their translators Daniel Borzutzky and Alexis Levitin lead a lively conversation on what is lost and found in the challenging process of translating poetry.
Conversation: Who Is It Can Tell Me Who I Am: Poetry and Identity
Eduardo C. Corral, Cynthia Arrieu-King, John Murillo, Gregory Pardlo
CAE Auditorium

Festival Poets Reading
Brian Barker, Fanny Howe, Taylor Mali
Trinity & St. Philip’s Cathedral

Festival Poets Reading
Sharon Dolin, Juan Felipe Herrera, Mark Hillringhouse
First Peddie Baptist Memorial Church

Conversation: Tell All the Truth, But Tell it Slant
Ada Limón, Thomas Lux, Idra Novey, Arthur Sze
North Star Academy Gym

Storytelling
Queen Nur and Dwight James
Aljira, A Center for Contemporary Art

Conversation: On Craft
C. K. Williams
Newark Museum

What is the larger purpose of craft itself?  What is the reward of mastering this hard-earned skill? Festival Poets consider and discuss questions related to the craft of making poems, from the general (such as work schedules and patterns of revision) to the specific (for instance, the uses of traditional forms, the subtleties of line breaks or the place of sound and phrasing in composition).


Open Reading
General Public/Moderator
New Jersey Historical Society

Noon -1:10 P.M.

On the 45th Anniversary of the Newark Uprising
Amiri Baraka, Clement Price
Victoria Theatre

The murders of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr., the personal experience of excessive force during the Newark uprising, and the civil rights movement itself all played crucial roles in transforming Amiri Baraka’s sense of the purpose of his art.  This founding figure of the Black Arts Movement joins historian and long-time Newark resident Dr. Clement Alexander Price in a candid conversation about the social and political events that shaped a movement and his own life and art.

Festival Poets Reading
Rachel McKibbens, Joseph Millar, John Murillo
Chase Room

Festival Poets Reading
Lamar Hill, Idra Novey, Benjamin Alire Sáenz
CAE Auditorium

Festival Poets Reading
Taalam Acey, Gregory Orr, Larissa Szporluk
Trinity & St. Philip’s Cathedral

Conversation: On Craft
Dorianne Laux
First Peddie Baptist Memorial Church

Festival Poets Reading
Emily Fragos, Terrance Hayes, Joan Siegel
North Star Academy Gym

TBD
TBD
Aljira, A Center for Contemporary Art


Conversation: On Craft
Jane Hirshfield
Newark Museum

Open Reading
General Public/Moderator
New Jersey Historical Society

1:30-2:40

Conversation: A Voice for the Voiceless
Philip Levine, Juan Felipe Herrera, Natasha Trethewey, Raúl Zurita
Prudential Hall

Many poems have been written for those who cannot speak for themselves.  Some have been silenced by neglect, pushed so far to the fringes of society the larger culture ignores them; some are silenced by being refused literacy and education; some are silenced by racism or sexism masked as aesthetics; some are silenced by imprisonment or death, the elimination of witnesses.  Festival Poets lead a discussion on how poems might speak for those who have been silenced.  
Conversation: American Poetries
Terrance Hayes, Rachel McKibbens, Arthur Sze, Larissa Szporluk
Victoria Theatre

Adrienne Rich wrote there is no such thing as an “American Poetry.”  Instead, there are American Poetries, so many divergent schools that no single style or aesthetic can be singled out as the definitively “American” one.  Festival Poets consider what we might gain from this diversity and by listening more closely to each other.
Sacred Circle Café: Native New Jersey
Taalam Acey, Ras Baraka, Lamar Hill, Michael O'Hara, Narubi Selah, DJ IRS
Chase Room

Since 1999, Sacred Circles Café has been an essential part of NJPAC’s Alternate Routes programming.  Featuring young and emerging spoken word artists who are on the verge of or have made their mark with the next generation of art audiences, Sacred Circles Café celebrates poetry, hip-hop, spoken word, dance, music and theater as the living embodiments of the ancient sacred song, chant and storytelling circles from which all poetry and theater emerged.  This special performance features poets from New Jersey.

Storytelling
Queen Nur and Dwight James
CAE Auditorium

With song and drama, one of poetry’s oldest relatives, storytelling will be offered during the Festival weekend.  
Conversation: On Craft
Eavan Boland
Trinity & St. Philip’s Cathedral

Conversation: Crossing Boundaries
Ada Limón, Idra Novey, Gregory Orr, Benjamin Alire Sáenz
First Peddie Baptist Memorial Church

Conversation: The Riches of Daily Life
Nicky Beer, Eduardo C. Corral, Jane Hirshfield
North Star Academy Gym

Student Reading
Rutgers/Newark MFA Writing Program
Aljira, A Center for Contemporary Art

Conversation: On Craft
Fanny Howe
Newark Museum

Open Mic
General Public/Moderator
New Jersey Historical Society

3:00-4:30

Readings & Music
Ada Limón, Arthur Sze, Raúl Zurita
Prudential Hall

3:00-4:10

Conversation: From Homer to Hip Hop/Poetry and the Oral Tradition
Kurtis Lamkin, Rachel McKibbens, Taylor Mali, Benjamin Alire Sáenz
Victoria Theatre

Festival Poets Reading
Paul Legault, Gregory Pardlo, Baraka Sele
Chase Room

Conversation: Going Public with Private Feelings
Nicky Beer, Richard Blanco, Sharon Dolin, Timothy Liu
Trinity & St. Philip’s Cathedral

Conversation: Where Poetry Matters
Nikky Finney, Joseph Millar, Gregory Orr, Narubi Selah
First Peddie Baptist Memorial Church

“Can poetry matter?” would not be asked by anyone who has ever attended, performed in, produced or organized any of the open mikes, poetry jams or slams that have sprung up in community centers, church basements, libraries, bookstores and coffee shops all across the country.  At these events it is immediately, powerfully obvious how crucial this avenue for self-expression and self-discovery is for many of our young people.  This conversation will explore how and where poetry matters for individuals and societies.
Conversation: In the Path of the Storm
Patricia Smith, Natasha Trethewey
North Star Academy Gym

Few natural disasters have captured the attention and fired the emotion of so many for so long as Hurricane Katrina has.  The original storm was followed by a storm of outrage by what many saw as a catastrophic failure to help those in distress.  Two poets as different in style and temperament as Natasha Trethewey and Patricia Smith have written book length treatments of the storm.Join them in a reading and conversation.
Giving Voice to Adrienne Rich
Moderator
Aljira, A Center for Contemporary Art

In this celebration of her work, friends, fellow poets and audience members will read from the work of Adrienne Rich, one our most influential contemporary poets and a long-time Dodge Festival favorite
Conversation: On Craft
Juan Felipe Herrera
Newark Museum

3:00-5:00

Open Mic
General Public/Moderator
New Jersey Historical Society

6:30-9:30

Readings & Music
Nikky Finney, Henri Cole, Dorianne Laux, C. K. Williams, Patricia Smith, New Jersey Symphony Orchestra String Quartet
Prudential Hall





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