September 7, 2012

Claudia Serea's Angels and Beasts, reading 9/28

Claudia Serea's 
Angels & Beasts
http://www.phoeniciapublishing.com/angels--beasts.html

74 prose poems from this Romanian-American poet, a rising star in the world of surrealistic poetry.
This collection of surreal prose poems is inspired by dreams, nightmares, growing up in Communist Romania and the immigrant's life in New York City.

Reading and BOOK SIGNING EVENT
September 28, 2012, 7 p.m.
GainVille Café
17 Ames Ave., Rutherford NJ

Here are what other poets are saying about the collection:

These prose poems are as sharp as the shrapnel from a nail bomb. They leave you shaken and bloodied and awed that anything so small can be so powerful.
—Howie Good, Ph.D., professor of journalism at SUNY New Paltz, author of Dreaming in Red (Right Hand Pointing, 2012)

Serea's Angels & Beasts manages to perfectly blend quirky surrealism with expert minimalist craft: her sentences are woven with a stunning attention to detail, seemingly stitched with the same blood, fruit and tears that she writes about. When she writes, "The pears were small red tears we weren't allowed to eat," the reader cannot help but to feel as if she devoured something forbidden. The body is on high when reading Serea.
—Lisa Marie Basile, MFA, author of Andalucia and A Decent Voodoo, and editor of Patasola Press, The Poetry Society of New York


Claudia is heir to horrors, and she whispers her inheritance to children, who run delighted through sunlit fields. Read her poems and become those children.
—Don Zirilli, editor of Now Culture

There is so much to admire in these firecrackers from Claudia Serea: the simple elegance of her language, the deep mythos of her vision, the sheer architecture of each narrative, and—most dear to this reader—the startling brilliance of her endings, which teach us to leap from the ruts of our own expectations and see our world anew.
—Jeff McMahon, editor of Contrary Magazine, Lecturer, Master of Arts Program in the Humanities, Committee on Creative Writing, The University of Chicago


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